Tag Archives: Turkey

Turkish Hospitality — Near Zincirli

ZincirliRecent events have led to confusing attitudes towards Turkey.  Our experiences have been typically positive.  A few years ago Mary and I were traveling in a rented car trying to find Zincirli in “eastern” Turkey near the Syrian border.  As we were heading south on a back road in a broad valley I spotted what I thought was wool from recently sheared sheep “airing” on the roof of a house in a small Turkish village.  I thought that this might make an interesting “cultural” shot, so I doubled back, parked the car and got out with my camera to take a few pictures.

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Drying/Airing What? — On the Roof Top
Note the Two Women and the Man — who where shouting at us
Click on Image to Enlarge

Before I could shoot more than three or four photos, the women on the roof of the house began shouting at me and I thought—oops, I am now in trouble (poor cultural sensitivity?!—usually I am able to stay in the background)!  To top it off, a man came bursting out of the door running at me!

Well, my Turkish is very close to non-existent, and his English was not-existent.  But through some frantic gestures, he indicated they wanted us to come in.  I was not sure why—and a bit fearful.  Well, he kept insisting so Mary and I followed him through the doorway into the lower level of the structure—basically a small stable.  After we ascended the stair case we burst out on to the open air roof where three women, and several children greeted us with big smiles!

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Part of a Turkish Family in a Village Near Zincirli
Turkish Hospitality at Its Best
Click on Image to Enlarge

We found out that what they had hanging on the roof was the interior (stuffing) of their bedding.  After the long winter they were airing it out and fluffing it up!

They wanted to serve us a full meal, which we declined, but of course they insisted we stay for çay (tea)!  We had a great time smiling and gesturing.  We showed them pictures of our children and they showed us pictures of theirs (on their mobile phone)!

What can I say, but these folk were just so friendly and so nice—to two strange strangers!  And they sent us off with proper directions to Zincirli (that was not marked to well on the map that we had!#$%@!

To view photos of Zincirli and very important artifacts from there, Click Here (without obligation or cost)—including the very important Kulamuwa Inscription written in North Phoenician.

Marriage and Bottles on the Chimneys?

After visiting Hierapolis in Turkey (Colossians 4:13) we typically travel east down the Meander Valley to Didyma, Miletus and Priene.  Sometimes we have taken a back road that leads through the small village of Sigla.  Here they have the custom of placing bottles on the top of their chimneys to announce that there is a daughter in the family who is available for marriage!

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Bottles on the chimneys announcing the availability of marriageable daughter in the small village of Sigla!

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Another house in the village of Sigla — note the bottles on the two chimneys!

Inscribed Columns in Temples

In the first three chapters of the New Testament book of Revelation the author addresses seven churches in the Roman Province of Asia (=modern western Turkey).  In doing this he often makes allusions to cultural items that were especially meaningful to his first century hearers.

For example, in the name of Jesus he writes to the Church at Philadelphia:

I am coming soon … the one who overcomes I will make a pillar in the temple of my GodI will write on him the name of my God and the name of the city of my God, the new Jerusalem, which is coming down out of heaven from my God; and I will also write on him my new name. Rev 3:11–13 (NIV)

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Inscribed Columns in Temples

In the first three chapters of the New Testament book of Revelation the author addresses seven churches in the Roman Province of Asia (=modern western Turkey).  In doing this he often makes allusions to cultural items that were especially meaningful to his first century hearers.

Temple of Zeus at Euromos (Turkey)

For example, in the name of Jesus he writes to the Church at Philadelphia:

I am coming soon … the one who overcomes I will make a pillar in the temple of my GodI will write on him the name of my God and the name of the city of my God, the new Jerusalem, which is coming down out of heaven from my God; and I will also write on him my new name. Rev 3:11–13 (NIV)

Continue reading