Tag Archives: Jesus Christ

Cornerstone

One of our favorite places to visit in Turkey is the Temple of Apollo at Didyma.

Didyma is an ancient religious site located near Yenihisar in western Turkey. It is situated about 39 mi. [62 km.] south of Ephesus (as the crow flies).

It was the site of a world famous oracle of Apollo (compare Delphi! in Greece). The oldest temple at Didyma was completed about 560 B.C. but destroyed in 494 B.C. by Darius I, the Persian. About 300 B.C. Seleucus I Nicator began building the well-preserved Hellenistic Temple that still stands today. For the next 500(!) years it was under construction. It went out of use during the fourth century A.D. as Christianity grew stronger in this region.

People from all over the world would come to Didyma to consult the prophetess here. In addition, every fourth year a festival — including music, oratory, drama, and athletic events — was held here. Technically, Didyma was not a city, but a religious site.

View looking south along the northwest portion of the platform (crepidoma) upon which the Temple of Apollo stood. The visible “cornerstone” is in the lower right portion of the image.

Note, that if the cornerstone is “off,” so the foundation will be “off.”  But when the cornerstone is properly aligned then the foundation can be as well.  See the folowing.

In the book of Ephesians Paul compares the Church to the building of a Temple:

Eph. 2:19 Consequently, you are no longer foreigners and aliens, but fellow citizens with God’s people and members of God’s household, 20 built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the chief cornerstone.  21 In him the whole building is joined together and rises to become a holy temple in the Lord. 22 And in him you too are being built together to become a dwelling in which God lives by his Spirit.

Of course, it is probable that those living in Ephesus would have thought about the Temple of Artemis, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, that was located there.

View looking north at the area where the Temple of Artemis was located.

Not much remains of this once great temple. The water in the foreground, and the two (rebuilt) columns mark the spot where this temple once stood.

In the distance the walls on the horizon mark the site of the Ayasuluk Citadel and the large building below it is the Isa Bey Mosque. Below and to the right of the large tree on the horizon, barely visible, are the remains of the St. John Basilica.

In its day, the Temple of Artemis was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. At its height it had 127 columns

A coin of the city of Ephesus, showing the Temple of Artemis, from the reign of the Roman Emperor Maximus (A.D. 235–38).  On display in the British Museum.

Note the gabled pediment, the staircase leading up to the temple, the eight columns supporting the roof, and the statue of Artemis! Below the staircase is the name Ephesus spelled out in Greek.

View of a model at Miniatürk (Istanbul) of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus.

The Ephesians began to construct this version of the temple in 356 BC after a man named Herostratus had burned down the former temple. It was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world until the Goths sacked it in A.D. 263.