Tag Archives: Aqueduct

Seldom Visited Aqueduct at Caesarea

The High Level aqueduct at Caesarea Maritima is a site usually visited by tour groups to Caesarea.

Aqueduct Junction  — Note how one part turns left while the other channel continues straight.  Eventually, both sections lead to Caesarea.

But only 3 mi. [4.5 km.] to the north-northwest of Caesarea is a very well preserved portion of that same aqueduct—at the Israeli town of “Bet Hannanya.”

On the right, a Latin Inscription mentioning the the Roman Emperor Hadrian (ruled AD 117-138)

To visit the aqueduct, drive north on Route 4 from Caesarea.  Turn left (west) at the Bet Hannanya intersection, and left again toward the village.  The road passes right through the aqueduct—it is only two minutes from Route 4!

To view additional images of this aqueduct Click Here.

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Impressive Remains at Aspendos in Southern Turkey

Aspendos is a very impressive Roman site famous for is very well-preserved theater.

Well Preserved Theater at Aspendos

It is situated 28 mi. east of Antalya, 19 mi. east of Perge (visited by Paul and Barnaba), and 9 mi. [14.5 km.] inland (north) of the Mediterranean Sea coast.

After passing into and out of Greek and Persian hands, it submitted to Alexander the Great ca. 333 B.C., but had to pay annual tribute of 5,732 lb. [2,600 kg.] of gold to him! Subsequently it was variously controlled by the Seleucids (Syria) and the Ptolemies (Egypt). During the first and second centuries A.D. significant building activities took place. At the site the theater, aqueduct, and stadium are among the well–preserved remains.

Aqueduct at Aspendos

To view additional images of Aspendos Click Here.

Seldom Visited Aqueduct at Caesarea

The High Level aqueduct at Caesarea Maritima is a site usually visited by tour groups to Caesarea.

Aqueduct Junction  — Note how one part turns left while the other channel continues straight.  Eventually, both sections lead to Caesarea.

But only 3 mi. [4.5 km.] to the north-northwest of Caesarea is a very well preserved portion of that same aqueduct—at the Israeli town of “Bet Hannanya.”

On the right, a Latin Inscription mentioning the the Roman Emperor Hadrian (ruled AD 117-138)

To visit the aqueduct, drive north on Route 4 from Caesarea.  Turn left (west) at the Bet Hannanya intersection, and left again toward the village.  The road passes right through the aqueduct—it is only two minutes from Route 4!

To view additional images of this aqueduct Click Here.