Tomb of Jesus to Be Revealed

I cannot believe that this is going to happen in my lifetime!  The Christian communities that control the Church of the Holy Sepulcher have agreed to take apart the aedicule that encases what is believed to be the tomb of Jesus—beginning in April 2016!

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View looking down from the dome of the rotunda on to the structure that covers the Tomb of Jesus. This structure is the most recent of a series, from the time of Constantine that have enshrined the tomb of Jesus. It was constructed after the great fire of 1808 and was completed in 1810.

The New York Times has an extensive article on this topic that informs this post.

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View looking south at the northern wall of the monument that encases the Tomb of Jesus. The entrance to the tomb is from the left side of the image—behind the three large candelabra. Note the iron casing that prevents the structure from collapsing—that were put in place in 1947.

The idea is to peel away hundreds of years of the shrine’s history, clean it and put it back together.

They will take apart, slab by slab, the ornate marble shell built in 1810, during Ottoman rule of Jerusalem. The conservationists will then tackle the remains of the 12th-century Crusader shrine that lies underneath. That was erected after the Shiite ruler of Egypt, al-Hakim, destroyed the first Aedicule in 1009. The original was built by Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine, the Christian Roman emperor who did much to elevate the status of Christianity through the empire.

Please see the link to the NY Times article for details.

For more images of this shrine and the Church of the Holy Sepulcher Click Here.

HT: Jim Monson of Biblical Backgrounds

Fair Havens (Acts 27:8)

229_FHavensMap031225Acts 27 describes Paul’s journey, as a prisoner, from Caesarea in Palestine to Rome.

Paul, in the custody of a centurion, sailed W from Cnidus on an Alexandrian grain ship.  the weather forced them to sail on the S side of Crete.  They passed Cape Salmone … and took refuge at Fair Havens.  Since Fair Havens was only an open bay, the centurion, the captain, and the owner of the ship decided to attempt to reach Phoenix ….”
(A. Rupprecht in The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible)

However, the strong wind blew them off course and this led to eventual shipwreck on Malta before continuing on to Rome.

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Kali Limones — Acts 27:8 Fair Havens
The Bay plus the modern dock for small boats

Today the site is called “Kali Limones.”  It is somewhat difficult to get to for one must drive for 45 minutes through some rugged mountains.  The port today is basically a swimming beach with very few structures, an island on which four large oil tanks have been built, a dock (under development 2013) for small boats, and the Chapel of St. Paul—with an associated cave.

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Chapel of St. Paul (white church)
Cave of St. Paul (the brown doorway to the left of center)

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Port of Fair Havens
Note the island with the oil tanks (sigh)

To view 15 high-resolution images of Fair Havens, including more of the port and the interiors of the Chapel of St. Paul and the Cave of St. Paul Click Here.

When the apostle Paul was traveling as a prisoner from Caesarea, in Palestine, to Rome, after leaving the southwestern coast of Turkey

“… we sailed to the lee of Crete opposite Salmone … and came to a place called Fair Havens, near the town of Lasea … after the fast [Day of Atonement in late September] … the majority decided that we should sail on, hoping to reach Phoenix and winter there … so they weighed anchor and sailed along the [southern] shore of Crete … the ship was caught by the storm … we passed to the lee [south] of a small island called Cauda, we were hardly able to make the lifeboat secure.”  (Acts 27:7-16; NIV translation)

Church of Holy Sepulcher — The Syrians and the “Tomb of Joseph of Arimathea”

Today, while visiting the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, I had a chance to observe portions of a Syrian Jacobite Service in the “cavern-like” chapel just to the west of the Tomb of Jesus.

Carl Rasmussen Copyright and Contact

Syrian Jacobite service near the “Tomb of Joseph of Arimathea.”

Most Christian groups visiting Jerusalem will visit the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in the Old City of Jerusalem.  A few of them will visit the small cavern-like chapel that is located west of the Tomb of Jesus.  If they do, the following is what they see and many will pronounce it “uglee.”

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Syrian Chapel — without a service!  Contrast the image above when it is prepared for the worship service of the Syrian Jacobites!

On the left is the wooden altar—where the priest above was serving—and in the lower right portion of the image is the low entrance into the Tomb of Joseph of Arimathea (see following).

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View of two of the niches (kokhim) of a first century A.D. tomb, into which bodies were placed. The entrances were then sealed.

This tomb is entered via the Syrian Chapel and is sometimes called the “Tomb of Joseph of Arimathea.” The tradition is that Joseph of Arimathea was buried here, after he had given his original tomb for Jesus to be buried in (see, for example, John 19:38-42). For an additional example of a typical tomb from the first century A.D. – from the Mt. of Olives – click here.

I believe that “technically” this area is under the authority of the Armenians, but they permit the Syrian Orthodox to worship here.

Jerusalem: Cutting Edge High Tech?!

And you (and I) thought Jerusalem was all antiquities and ultra religious people!

Well, did you know that:

Entrepreneur Magazine named Jerusalem among its top five places outside of Silicon Valley for tech startups to launch and thrive, calling Israel’s capital a ‘flourishing center for biomed, cleantech, Internet/mobile startups, accelerators, investors and supporting service providers.’

Jerusalem has 500 companies working in tech today.
7 High-tech industrial parks
500+ Startup companies
350+ Tech Events

HT  Israel 21c.

 

70 FREE Aerial Views of Israel & Maps

Bill Schlegel, the author of the Satellite Bible Atlas, has made available to those who own his Atlas two wonderful teaching tools.

The first is a complete digital set of the maps that he produced for use in his Atlas.  One of the questions that I frequently receive is “where can I get maps that I can use in my PowerPoint presentations?”  Well, these certainly are useful for that purpose.

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View of Caesarea Maritima looking east. In the foreground, protruding out into the Mediterranean Sea is the Herodian Palace. Behind it to the right is the theater and behind it to the left is the Stadium/Hippodrome/Circus. Courtesy of Bill Schlegel, Satellite Bible Atlas.

Recently he has also made available 70 Aerial Photographs of sites of biblical significance.  They are also free to download (for owners of his Atlas).  They are of good resolution and will be useful for personal use and (again) in PowerPoint presentations.  Each image is 300-400 KB in size.  He took them in very clear weather using a drone.

Along with the 70  aerial photos is a pdf document with an entry for each of the images.  Each entry, after naming the image, provides a short synopsis of the biblical importance of the site.  Most of the images are of sites that most travelers to Israel will have visited, but there are also a few of  not–so–frequently visited places, such as: et–Tell, Maqatir, Dothan, Timnah,  Wadi Farah, and Tel Serah (Ziklag).

He has also produced numerous teaching/learning videos that I have previously noted.

William Schlegel’s Satellite Bible Atlas can be purchased here.

The Best Rolling Stone Tomb in Israel — Khirbet Midras

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View Looking East at the Entrance to the First Century A.D. Tomb

View looking east at the entrance to the tomb. The rolling stone was 6 ft. [1.8 m.] in diameter and 1.3 ft [0.4 m.] thick. It was placed between two walls, each built of hewn stone. When discovered, it still rolled in its trough!

The tomb itself was in use during the Roman Period — up until A.D. 135.

In my estimation, it was the best example of a rolling stone tomb in the country of Israel. It seems to illustrate well passages from the Gospels which speak of Jesus’ tomb as being closed by a rolling stone. See especially Matthew 27:57-66; 28:1-2; Mark 15:42–47; 16:1–8; Luke 24:1–2, 10–11; and John 20:1, 11–18.

MidrasMap3Horvat Midras (Hebrew) or Khirbet Durusiya (Arabic) is located 19 mi. [30 km.] southwest of Jerusalem in the Shephelah. The ancient remains are spread over hundreds of dunams in the area. The site dates to the Hellenistic and Roman periods.

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View of the Courtyard of the “Rolling Stone Tomb” at Khirbet Midras—prior to its destruction

In 1976 part of the cemetery was excavated. Several tombs were uncovered, including, in my estimation, THE BEST ROLLING STONE TOMB in the country. Unfortunately in the late 1990’s the tomb site was totally destroyed by vandals!#%$@!!

BUT it has been reconstructed and is now visible in the Adullam Park!

To view 3 additional image of the tomb Click Here.

For images of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher see: Calvary and Tomb.

Click to see images of Gordon’s Calvary and the Garden Tomb.

Palm Sunday and “Holy Week”

On Sunday, 29 March, Christians will be remembering Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem.

For those of you who might be looking for High Resolution images related to the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, the Last Supper in the “Upper Room,” and the events clustered around the final week in his earthly life I will be posting some useful links in the days ahead.

To view 10 images (with commentary) of a modern procession commemorating this event Click Here.

Use the following this link to find may High Resolution images related to Gethsemane, the Upper Room, a Rolling Stone Tomb, Gordon’s Calvary, the Garden Tomb, and the Church of the Holy Sepulcher.