Category Archives: Useful Web Site

Biblical People Confirmed Archaeologically — A Very Useful Tool!

The folk over at Bible History Daily have placed on line a very useful listing: “53 People in the [Hebrew] Bible Confirmed Archaeologically.”  This not only lists their names and relevant biblical passages, but also has a short article on each of the 53 along with where the relevant extra–biblical texts and pictures can be found! This is a very useful listing  for it can be very time consuming to try to find this information elsewhere!!

See a sample entry below.


I have included a photo of the object referred to in the second paragraph of the “Black Obelisk (6 1/2 ft.. high) panel portraying Jehu, the Israelite king, bowing down in submission to Shalmaneser III (from Calah/Nimrund in Iraq)”

Jehu, the Israelite king, bowing in submission Shalmaneser III. From the British Museum.

14. Jehu, king, r. 842/841–815/814, 1 Kings 19:16, etc., in inscriptions of Shalmaneser III. In these, “son” means nothing more than that he is the successor, in this instance, of Omri (Raging Torrent, p. 20 under “Ba’asha . . . ” and p. 26). A long version of Shalmaneser III’s annals on a stone tablet in the outer wall of the city of Aššur refers to Jehu in col. 4, line 11, as “Jehu, son of Omri” (Raging Torrent, p. 28; RIMA 3, p. 54, A.0.102.10, col. 4, line 11; cf. ANET, p. 280, the parallel “fragment of an annalistic text”). Also, on the Kurba’il Statue, lines 29–30 refer to “Jehu, son of Omri” (RIMA 3, p. 60, A.0.102.12, lines 29–30).

In Shalmaneser III’s Black Obelisk, current scholarship regards the notation over relief B, depicting payment of tribute from Israel, as referring to “Jehu, son of Omri” (Raging Torrent, p. 23; RIMA 3, p. 149, A.0. 102.88), but cf. P. Kyle McCarter, Jr., “‘Yaw, Son of ‘Omri’: A Philological Note on Israelite Chronology,” Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 216 (1974): pp. 5–7.


Quote from Rasmussen, Carl G. Zondervan Atlas of the Bible — Revised Edition. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2010, p. 162.

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A Very Useful Web Site of Ancient History — More Traffic than the British Museum or the Louvre!

This may be “old news” to many of you, but I recently became aware of the web site Ancient History Encyclopedia.  Its mission

is to improve history education worldwide by creating the most complete, freely accessible and reliable history resource in the world.

Currently they have around 200 articles on the Near East— articles that “cover the cradle of civilization, home of the first empires, and the world’s oldest cities.”  They also have 330 articles on the Greco–Roman world.

The articles are well–written, informative, and accurate.  They are peer reviewed.  I follow them on Twitter @ahencyclopedia where they seem to announce new articles as they become available and usually draw attention to one “older” article (like from the past few years) each day.  The lengths of the articles vary, but they typically seem to be a 5-15 minute read—depending on how familiar one is with the topic.  There is a search engine on the web site.

BTW – you are invited to follow me on Twitter “@go2Carl”— I only post one or two “tweets” a day—if that.


More Descriptive Details About the Ancient History Encyclopedia

Key Facts

  • All content is reviewed by our team of expert editors, ensuring highest quality
  • Trusted by teachers around the world as set reading for their students
  • More monthly traffic than the British Museum or the Louvre, and more monthly readers than the world’s most popular history magazines
  • Engaging the digital generation: We’re telling the exciting stories in history, using all media types (text, image, map, video, etc.)
  • Read more about our audience in our media presentation.

Our Work

We work to engage the digital generation: We are telling exciting historical stories using text, video, interactive features, social media and mobile apps. Every submission to the encyclopedia is carefully reviewed by our editorial team, making sure only the highest quality content is published to our site.

We aim to inspire our readers with the stories of the past, making history engaging and exciting for everyone. Our publication follows academic standards, but written in an easy-to-read manner with students and the general public in mind.

Ancient History Encyclopedia is entirely run by dedicated contributors and volunteers from all over the world. Our multi-cultural team is as neutral and as objective as possible, which is why we’re a completely independent organization.

Our Goal

Ancient history is only the start: We are working to create the world’s leading general history resource, covering all time periods of human history, freely accessible on the internet. Education is at the core of what we do, which is why we aim to provide more useful tools to teachers and students, such as interactive content, videos, mobile apps, and teaching resources.

We also plan to make our content available in other languages and other formats, such as printed books.