Nemea — A Marvelous “PanHellenic” Site to be Closed

NemeaMap030708One of my favorite sites in the Peloponnese area of Greece is the site of Nemea.  Nemea is located only  11.6 mi. southwest of Corinth.  There, one of the four PanHellenic festivals was held every two years in the stadium of Nemea.  The other locations of these festivals were Delphi, Isthmia, and Olympia.

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The Temple of Zeus at Nemea
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Nemea has been well-excavated and presented to the public.  Its museum is outstanding for the extraordinary finds, and their presentation, contain therein.  It is a shame that this place is slated for closing (!#$%@!)  as the Greek government tries to balance its budget.

However (personal confession), on my typical trip to the Peloponnese, within the context of a 17 or 21 day trip, we typically do a day excursion from Athens where we visit the Diolkos, Corinth, Mycenae, and Cenchrea.  Because of time (the Greeks close their archaeological sites at 3:00 PM —Ugh [more !#$@!]) and traffic constraints we have not visited Nemea in several years (sigh!!).

[Aside—how in the world can a tourist/academic group get to Corinth or Mycenae by the 8:00 AM opening time — what in the world are the guards/ticket takers doing at that time???  At sites like Corinth, Mycenae, and Nemea, why in the world don’t they open later and close later—hello??]

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Heracles and the Nemean Lion — From Perga (Turkey)
Note on his left side the “skin” of the lion — its head and claws
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Nemea is also well known in Greek mythology as the site of the first of the twelve labors of Heracles (Herakles).  Heracles was the son of the god Zeus and a mortal Alcmene.  Although originally a mortal, he eventually attained divine status and was widely worshiped throughout Greece.  As punishment for killing six of his children he had to perform 12 “labors” (= very difficult tasks).  The first of which was to kill the Nemean Lion.  He wrestled with the lion, strangled it, and subsequently used its pelt as a cloak.

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One response to “Nemea — A Marvelous “PanHellenic” Site to be Closed

  1. Pingback: links to the land | preachersmith

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